Category Archives: Idealist

The Binding Counselor

“He was frail and drained of energy;
his eyes were dull, his face contorted with pain

— and I was, frankly, worried about his health.
Was this drawn and ailing man slumped in a wheelchair the legendary healer I had read about?
Had I come west on a wild goose chase? ” [The Voice (Kindle Locations 70-71)]

Yes, he was the legendary psychotherapist.  Wild goose chase? — maybe, actually in retrospect, no ambiguity here.

“Dr. Erickson asked to be excused, and then, about an hour later, I was astonished to see him wheel himself back into his study, fully alert and revitalized, cheerful, eyes twinkling, ready to get to work.”  [The Voice (Kindle Locations 72-73)]

erickson_ambiguity

A Paradox.

“Dr. Erickson encouraged me to continue my studies and develop my own ideas and techniques, both for my own therapy and for my patients. This respect for my ability to find my own best solutions was fundamental to Dr. Erickson’s philosophy of healing, and was one of the most important lessons he taught me in our time together. In this and in so many ways, his tutelage and sensitivity were nothing less than inspiring.”  — Brian Alman [The Voice (Kindle Locations 82-85).]

A Counselor.

Continue reading The Binding Counselor

Righteous Nobility

Righetous Nobility 3

Man of Steel might literally “set the tone” for a linear cinematic DC Universe, as Empire Magazine reports that Warner Bros. will want Zack Snyder to direct Justice League: given Man of Steel’s success at the box office.

Which quite frankly makes me question if  WB executives even took the time to SEE the film they made with Snyder less than two years ago, entitled: you guessed it, Sucker Punch (23%).  Trololol.

In related superhero arms race” news, Thor: The Dark World released a pretty bossy one-sheet this week along with it’s first trailer:

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I Am I Said..

He once said that nowhere felt like home and that he didn’t have many friends. It’s been a lifelong struggle to fit in.”

He grew up in Forties working-class Brooklyn, the son of Polish-Russian Jews. He says of that, “a childhood shapes you and you’re like soft clay when you’re a child, in every respectIf  fans are familiar with my music they are familiar with me,  because the music is a direct reflection of who I am as a person.” 

             ” I got an emptiness deep inside

            And I’ve tried but it won’t let me go..”

He would ride the subway every day to college where he was studying to become a doctor. Having received a guitar for his 15th birthday from his parents, he wrote songs on the train ride.

“The subway was the only time I had privacy and quiet.”

His family were forever moving house in search of better business opportunities, which resulted in him having attended nine different schools at age sixteen.  This lifestyle was forced on him by circumstances and it was instrumental in forming his internal, fiercely self-reliant personality. He says it was there, in his childhood that he developed a pathological resistance to any kind of uniformity.  Along with that and his singing talent he became somewhat of an enigma to those close to him and he was, without exception, excluded from every circle of friends he encountered. He  became a loner, “I don’t fit in” and a necessary condition for his survival. This forced him to create an imaginary friend, as he tells us in ‘Shilo’:

Papa says he’d love to be with you
If he had the time
So you turn to the only friend you can find
There in your mind
Shilo, when I was young
I used to call your name
When no one else
Would come
Shilo, you always came
And we’d play….
Even in adulthood, he has retained the ability to withdraw into a protective world of his own, and at the end of 1976, he said: “I still live in a fantasy world sometimes, because it’s safe.  It’s a cushion,  a protective thing you build, and nothing can hurt me, at least in my own mind.”
He also developed an interest in writing lyrics and realised that music facilitates social interaction and that it helped him to overcome his innate shyness. He would later write ‘Longfellow serenade’ a song of which he was especially fond of, because it took him back to those school days when he was too shy to ask a girl on a date, so he would write her a poem. He would tell us:
“I imagined the poet who writes the words he cannot speak to the woman he wants to woo and win.”
Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1984, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame  2011, his songs have been covered internationally by many performers from various musical genres. With the exception of the period between 1972 and 1976  when he temporarily bade the stage farewell so as to ‘find himself’ (and spend more time with his family), he has, since the late 1960s, drawn millions of people from all over the world to his concerts. In a 2008 performance in Glastonbury, England alone, the audience totalled more than 170,000 people.

“I have to know myself and I have spent my life trying to know myself.”

He is an American singer-songwriter with a career that has spanned five decades, he has sold over 125 million records worldwide including 48 million in the United States alone. Considered the third most successful adult  contemporary artist ever on the Billboard chart behind Barbra Streisand and Elton John.

Continue reading I Am I Said..

Are you Vivek?

It was an unreported event.

A woman came out of one little home … and looked him over wonderingly. The boy and the woman gazed at each other for a long moment, and then the woman finally said in astonishment: “Are you Vivek?”

The test of the morality of a society is what it does for its children.
~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The woman had been trying get her children out of a brothel for years: ever since she had escape the brothel that had enslaved her and her children (a boy and a girl) who were born in the brothel.

“Journalists tend to be good at covering events that happen on a particular day, but we slip at covering events that happen every day.”  — Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn.

meena_and_vivek

Continue reading Are you Vivek?

Cutthroat Diversity

Cutthroat Diversity-3

Game of Thrones is back and Thank the Gods:

UPDATE:

For those of you who do not know, Game of Thrones is an HBO series in it’s third season based off  a series of popular fantasy novels entitled “A Song of Ice and Fire”.  Thrones chronicles the violent conflicts and struggles between noble families vying for control of the ‘Iron Throne’.  The unprecedented genre series focuses primarily on political and military strife between four major powersHouse LannisterHouse BaratheonHouse Stark, and House Targaryen.  Just like the real four major powers or Temperaments, these ones certainly have their differences.  Let’s take a look.

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As Did the Dissimilarity..

“The similarity of our inclinations welded us closely together as did the dissimilarity of our temperaments.”

— English translation of August Kubizek comments about his friend.

“He made excellent use of his undoubted histrionic talents.”

Histrionic — melodramatic, theatrical, dramatic, exaggerated, stagy, showy, affected, artificial, overacted, overdone; hammy, ham, campy.  Hysteria — an archaic term for a kind of madness.

There was no doubt he was to become a “deeply serious man.” — That was evident even to August as a young man. For Adolf did not have the “typical Austrian” sense of humour. For he was choleric in nature, or in modern terms: an Idealist.

He became a Zealot. A German Zealot. The German people were being humiliated by the French and British demanding Reparations. Then there were those Bolshevik and Menshevik Russians and Germans running around in Munich, and his vision to make “his people” whole again. Lastly, there were some Jews with material goods…

Unity.

german_post_wwi

Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t

Continue reading As Did the Dissimilarity..

Super Brawl

JLA - 2

Justice League seems to be in more hot water as WB execs have reportedly trashed Will Beall’s script with several sources claiming “it’s terrible”:

Quote1I’ve now heard from multiple sources that the Will Beall script for Justice League has been scrapped.  The story from each source is the same: it’s terrible.  Some sources seem to think the whole movie is going to fall apart and never happen, while some believe that Warner Bros will keep moving forward, unwilling to lose the superhero arms race.Quote2

WHOOPSY DAISIES.  I’m not a mathematician or anything but aren’t they already LOSING the “superhero arms race”? 

Seeing as The Avengers will assemble at the 85th Annual Academy Awards next week to present an award, while the Justice League doesn’t even exist yet?

Justice League’s saving grace may just be this film:

If Snyder dropped the ball however, WB is screwed.

While these superhero teams may be fictional, they express an extremely important idea: that people are fundamentally different from one another, and that that is a GOOD thing.  Let’s take a look.

Continue reading Super Brawl

Are Women Human?

dorothy_sayers

‘In reaction against the age-old slogan, “woman is the weaker vessel,” or the still more offensive, “woman is a divine creature,” we have, I think, allowed ourselves to drift into asserting that “a woman is as good as a man,” without always pausing to think what exactly we mean by that.

What, I feel, we ought to mean is something so obvious that it is apt to escape attention altogether, viz: (…) that a woman is just as much an ordinary human being as a man, with the same individual preferences, and with just as much right to the tastes and preferences of an individual.

What is repugnant to every human being is to be reckoned always as a member of a class and not as an individual person.’

That is what she wrote a long time ago.

********************************************************************************************

Yes, people are different, fundamentally and radically different, and people are the same, fundamentally same.

It’s called Temperament.  People are born different and the same.

“It is extraordinarily entertaining to watch the historians of the past … entangling themselves in what they were pleased to call the “problem” of Queen Elizabeth [I].

They invented the most complicated and astonishing reasons both for her success as a sovereign and for her tortuous matrimonial policy. She was the tool of Burleigh, she was the tool of Leicester, she was the fool of Essex; she was diseased, she was deformed, she was a man in disguise. She was a mystery, and must have some extraordinary solution.

Only recently has it occurred to a few enlightened people that the solution might be quite simple after all. She might be one of the rare people were born into the right job and put that job first.” — Dorothy Sayers

Dorothy Leigh Sayers (13 June 1893 – 17 December 1957) was a renowned English crime writer, poet, playwright, essayist, translator and Christian humanist. She was also a student of classical and modern languages. She is best known for her mysteries, a series of novels and short stories set between World War I and World War II that feature English aristocrat and amateur sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey, that remain popular to this day. However, Sayers herself considered her translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy to be her best work. She is also known for her plays, literary criticism and essays. [Wikipedia, revised]

Dorothy Sayers a Mentoring Idealist, a Contending Counselor:

“Some Idealists hold certain contentions that they put forth dramatically whenever the occasion requires or permits them to do so. Even so they make sure that their ways and means conform to regional norms, wishing, as they do, to sanction in a benevolent way…the Diplomatic Contender.

Counselors are like their Mentor twins, the Educators, in that both are directive, the one giving advice, the other directives.”— [Personology pages 174-5]

dorothy sayers the child

“Although we often succeed in teaching our pupils “subjects,” we fail lamentably on the whole in teaching them how to think: they learn everything, except the art of learning. It is as though we had taught a child, mechanically and by rule of thumb, to play “The Harmonious Blacksmith” upon the piano, but had never taught them the scale or how to read music; so that, having memorized “The Harmonious Blacksmith,” they still had not the faintest notion how to proceed from that to tackle “The Last Rose of Summer.”

[Dorothy Sayers, The Lost Tools of Learning]

Diplomatic Contenders are beyond compare as Counselors. Advisement is the side of diplomatic mediation that focuses on helping people to realise their potentials, and both kinds of enterprising Idealists have an unusually strong desire to contribute to the wellfaring and wellbeing of others and genuinely enjoy mentoring their companions toward greater personal fulfillment. [Personology, page 176]

Why do I say, “as though”? In certain of the arts and crafts, we sometimes do precisely this—requiring a child to “express himself” in paint before we teach him how to handle the colors and the brush. There is a school of thought which believes this to be the right way to set about the job. But observe: it is not the way in which a trained craftsman will go about to teach himself a new medium.”

[Dorothy Sayers, The Lost Tools of Learning]

Incidently, reknowned child’s author, J K Rowling (Harry Potter fame), also a Counselor Idealist cites and enjoys Sayer as a literary role model, while having through her own life enjoyed reading Sayer’s ‘whodunnit’ novels:

A friend of C S Lewis, (also a Counselor Idealist), Dorothy Sayers differed over the reason to write:

Dorothy L. Sayers believed strongly that one should not write mainly to please one’s audience. Certainly, audiences have needs, and many of her works were commissioned for particular populations or organizations. However, Sayers would generally write on something only if she found herself passionate about a given topic and thought she might have something to say about it—not just because someone asked her to write on that topic.

On this point, C.S. Lewis disagreed with Sayers. He often wrote for people who wanted an article on a particular subject written by a popular author because he felt a pastoral obligation to them.
…and not their only disagreement:
Sayers also disagreed with C.S. Lewis on the matter of women’s ordination. He wrote to her asking that she take a public stand against it (this defense of tradition needed to be written by a woman, he reasoned).  Instead, Sayers suggested she would be an “uneasy ally” for him because she did not see any theological reason why women should not be priests. She distinguished between whether a man or a woman should be “cast for the part” of “playing” Christ in the mass (it made the most dramatic sense for it to be a man, of course) and whether a man or a woman could represent Christ to humanity. Because Christ was the representative of all humanity, not simply, male humanity she believed either a woman or a man could reflect that representation.
Sayers’ influence did not cease upon her death in 1957. Theater companies continue to produce her plays, English professors include her Dante translation in their syllabi, mystery fans still read about Lord Peter and Harriett, and hundreds of classical schools around the world owe their existence to Sayers’ small essay “The Lost Tools of Learning.”
A thriving Dorothy L. Sayers Society meets yearly, mining her work in ever-greater detail. Perhaps most significantly, many of Sayers’ theological contributions keep returning to print.
It had been 1938 when she was invited to address a women’s group; her speech “Are Women Human?” was ahead of her time and probably more than a little shocking.
This address, along with an essay called “The Human Not-Quite-Human,” was published in a slim-but-powerful volume.
Sayers asserted that there is no such thing as a man’s job or a woman’s job, but that people should pursue vocations for which they are passionate and gifted. She challenged a culture that tended to define men’s interests and human interests synonymously, while holding women apart as some sort of special species, not-quite-human.
dorothy-sayers-with-skull

Intergalactic Synergy

Intergalactic Quaternity

Awards and Flu Seasons have commenced as the 2013 Golden Globes gave Bostonian Ben Affleck a pretty phatty sack including Best Director and Best Picture.  Daniel Day Lewis got best actor which let’s be honest isn’t very surprising to anyone.  So wash your hands and eat oranges as Oscar night approaches on February 24th.  Speaking of Oscar potential Star Wars Episode VII has officially hired director J.J. Abrams to helm the film.  The young director just finished his second Star Trek film and took the job reportedly after months of being courted by new Lucasfilm CEO Kathleen Kennedy.  Abrams even publicly announced that he would NOT direct the film, which evidently he was just flat out lying about.  What a SILLY GOOSE!  Some would say.  Abrams’ credits include Star Trek and Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, having also written and produced big name stuff like Lost and Alias.  Regardless, Disney’s newest branch seems pretty pumped to have him;

Quote1.pngIt’s very exciting to have J.J. aboard leading the charge as we set off to make a new Star Wars movie,” said Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy in a press release Jan. 25. “J.J. is the perfect director to helm this. Beyond having such great instincts as a filmmaker, he has an intuitive understanding of this franchise. He understands the essence of the Star Wars experience, and will bring that talent to create an unforgettable motion picture.”

Star Wars creator George Lucas also gave his blessing to the selection of Abrams. “I’ve consistently been impressed with J.J. as a filmmaker and storyteller,” said Lucas. “He’s an ideal choice to direct the new Star Wars film and the legacy couldn’t be in better hands.Quote2.png

Having just landed the biggest directing gig in Hollywood, let’s take a look at Abrams’ most recent project:

Continue reading Intergalactic Synergy

Queen of People’s Hearts

I do things differently, because I don’t go by a rule book, because I lead from the heart, not the head, and albeit that’s got me into trouble in my work, I understand that.  But someone’s got to go out there, love people and show it.

                                I am a free spirit – unfortunately for some.”

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“This is me, this is me!” exclaimed Princess Diana when she was read Dr. David Keirsey‘s portrait of an Healer Idealist, (INFP).

Continue reading Queen of People’s Hearts