Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited

Murder Mystery

BBC One original miniseries Ordeal By Innocence was made available on Amazon Prime Video August 9, 2018.

#OrdealByInnocence is based on literature of the same name.

rottentomatoes: 90%

metacritic: 71

imdb: 7.2

***SPOILERS AHEAD***




Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie LimitedRachel Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Anna ChancellorRachel Argyll

British heiress Rachel Argyll sustains a blunt force trauma to her cranium and is murdered in her home in 1956 rural England.  Her adopted son Jack is incarcerated for the crime.


Rachel Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Anna ChancellorRachel Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Anna Chancellor

“That’s rather tight, Jack.” — Rachel Argyll

“Michael, Christina, these are your new sisters and brother.  Mary, Hester, and Jack.  They were all brought to live here too.  A good bath, tea and then straight to bed.  Ah… and this is your new daddy.  Come along.” — Rachel Argyll

“‘Butter.’  There are two T’s, Michael.  Two of them.  Christina can do it.  Why can’t you?  Butter.  Stand up.  Look me in the eye and say it.  Give me that.  Kirsten, Michael has had a little… mishap.  A dab of disinfect and a plaster, I think.  Mary, your French composition.” — Rachel Argyll

“I’m not cross, Hester.  It’s Christmas Eve.  How can I be cross?” — Rachel Argyll

“Always pulling at me!  It’s intolerable!” — Rachel Argyll

“What are you doing?  You’ve got guests.  Change into your going-away outfit while your husband is still sober enough to walk you out of the house.  Because it doesn’t look right.  Always such hot little hands.  You’ll mark my suit.  Come on.” — Rachel Argyll

“You’re leaving, Jack.  Well?” — Rachel Argyll


Kirsten Lindstrom, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Morven Christie Kirsten Lindstrom, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Morven Christie Kirsten Lindstrom

“Aren’t you a grubby little tyke, Jack?” — Kirsten Lindstrom

“I didn’t hear you.  Yes, Miss Vaughan.” — Kirsten Lindstrom

“Ah!  Oh, you need a shave.  Don’t they sell razors in London?  Where’s your case?” — Kirsten Lindstrom

“As you wish, Lieutenant Durrant.” — Kirsten Lindstrom

“Thank you, Chief Constable.  Difficult?” — Kirsten Lindstrom


Leo Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Bill Nighy Leo Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Bill NighyLeo Argyll

“Everybody ready?” — Leo Argyll

“Stop.  Kirsten.  Now, now, calm yourself.  There.  There, there.  Ssh.  Ssh.  There, there.” — Leo Argyll

“If you had a name… all your life you’ve courted trouble and never faced any consequences.  But you have to face the consequences now, Jack.  You have to.  ‘And that’s the last twist of the knife, Jack.’  Your refusal to admit what you’ve done.  It was you… …your fingerprints mixed… with your mother’s blood.  No-one else’s.  Yours, Jack.” — Leo Argyll

“Mickey?  Dear boy!  My best man.  Mary, isn’t this wonderful?  He’s come home.  This gathering tonight… I absolutely will not mind if you slope off.  There’s so many people to thank, and since the wedding itself is only going to be us… do you think it’s… too soon?  Me marrying again.  Mary’s not taking it particularly well.  Well, that means a great deal, you know.  A very great deal.  Hester is giddy to see you.  Prepare yourself for an onslaught.  It wouldn’t have been the same without you, son.  I’ve missed you.  Very much.” — Leo Argyll

“Hello.  Look who’s here.  Door, Hester, please.  Will still be here when you’ve answered the door.” — Leo Argyll

“My apologies for keeping you waiting.  My family are very… shocked.  A gentleman amateur.  Mr. Calgary– does that have a bearing on this situation?  Where were you going when Jack stopped you?  What were you late for?  It’s been 18 months since my wife was… killed.  Why have you not come forward before?  The Arctic?  you were going to a dinner party, so you were wearing a dinner jacket?  I just want to be absolutely clear.  A dinner suit.  Black tie, black jacket, black trousers?  We’ve had a lot of people coming here claiming to be Jack’s alibi, to know something about him, about our family.  All those claims proved fraudulent.  Phychics.  Tarot readers.  A water diviner turned up once.  With rods.  Greedy, venal people.  Fame-seekers and charlatans.  You can imagine the hurt and distress that caused us.  Well, one again, you’re… too late.  Jack died in prison before the case could come to trial.  He got into a fight with another inmate.  Jack was a difficult young man.  We loved him but he was difficult.  Disturbed.  We hope he’s at peace now.  And I hope you’ll leave us to our own hard-won peace.” — Leo Argyll

“I’d hoped… that one day he might understand what he’d done to us.  I’d hoped your brother might one day be sorry.  He wasn’t.  But we forgive him because we loved him.  And now…  we have to look after each other… and keep on living.” — Leo Argyll

“Actually, we’re all rather busy, so if you wouldn’t mind… there’s a hotel in town.  Good day, Dr. Calgary.  Don’t come back.  There’s nothing for you here.  No more information than he’d read in the newspaper. Like all the others, he said he was wearing a dinner jacket.  So we know he was lying.  He told me he’s a physicist who’s only just returned from an expedition to the Arctic.  Which has got to be one of the best ones yet.  Forget about him.  This is not going to shake us.  Hester, take those boxes upstairs.  Kirsten, we’ll have tea on the lawn.” — Leo Argyll

“Dear friends, I would like to say thank you to Gwenda… for agreeing to be my wife.  Which I think is happening quite soon.  And I would like to say thank you… … to my children… … all grown up now… … for giving us their blessing.  Thank you for being here.  You have been steadfast during the most appalling ordeal any family could endure.  And you have the gratitude of myself and my children… … forever.  The toast I would like to make is to Rachel – wife, mother, a force of nature, a crusader for good.  Rachel.” — Leo Argyll


Jack Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Anthony BoyleJack Argyll

“Smile, mother.  So everyone knows we’re happy.” — Jack Argyll

“Ahh!  She was alive when I left the house.  I hitched a lift.  It was a good car.  It was big.  It was practically brand new.  The driver was in his thirties.  He was wearing a dark overcoat and a striped shirt.  I saw the cuff.  It was striped, like pajamas.  I’m sorry.  Am I boring you, father?  I didn’t ask his name.  I didn’t know I’d be needing it.  I didn’t kill her.  Please find that man.  Find that man.  He can prove it.  ‘I didn’t do it.'” — Jack Argyll

“Oh, here she comes.  Mother Superior.  What’s the rush?  Why can’t she just sit here with us if she wants to?  Oh, and that’s what matters, is it?  Looking right.  One day.  One day.  Just to crack the shell.  See if there’s anything inside.” — Jack Argyll

“God Almighty Mother.” — Jack Argyll

“Can I get a lift?  Yeah.  Well, it’s nearly that now, so you’re late.” — Jack Argyll


Bellamy Gould, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Brian McCardieBellamy Gould

“Perfect match.” — Bellamy Gould

“Wonderful spread, Kirsten.  You always feed us so well.  Things are bound to change under the new Mrs. Argyll.  It gets difficult, you just let me know.  I have Leo’s ear.  I wouldn’t like to see you get sidelined – when you were so devoted to Rachel.” — Bellamy Gould


Gwenda Vaughn, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Alice EveGwenda Vaughn

“Leo!  I’m off now!  Don’t lose track of the time!  Bloody hell.  All the cuttings raked up!  All the cuttings!  I’ll be checking.  Kirsten!  Why doesn’t anyone in this house answer when I call for them?  My dress for this evening is hanging in my room.  It needs a press.  And will you please cover your legs?  Hosiery.  No-one wants to see your chunky calves.  And no creases – in the tablecloths.” — Gwenda Vaughn

“Hester.  I don’t know what you’re smiling at.  It’s my house now.  Hester!  Honesty, Hester, we’re going to be late.  I think fitting bridesmaids’ dresses is a teensy bit more important than stamping books in a boring, bloody library, actually, Tina.  Oh.  Now look what you made me do.” — Gwenda Vaughn

“Oh, Michael, the tailor’s coming tomorrow.  To make sure your morning suit fits.  Hello, by the way.  I’m so glad that you could make it.  Ah!  You’re very early.  Where’s your instrument?  Your cello.  And I do hope you have something smarter to wear.  Oh, for God’s sake.  What is the matter with people?  This is a formal occasion.  We can find something for him to wear.” — Gwenda Vaughn

“Tina, it’s about time.  I’m beside myself.  I need help with the tables.  Can you make sure they all have little lamps on them?” — Gwenda Vaughn

“Mm.  Mm, mm-hm.  Oh.  I’m honestly not trying to take your mother’s place, Mary.  I’d like us to be friends.  We could have shopping trips and lunches.  Just us girls.  Well, look at you.  Playing the adoring, heartbroken daughter.  ‘My poor mother.’  The thing is… no-one hated her more than you.” — Gwenda Vaughn

“No.  Stop it.  Smile.” — Gwenda Vaughn


Dr. Arthur Calgary, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Luke Treadaway Dr. Arthur Calgary, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Luke TreadawayDoctor Arthur Calgary

“Nearest stop to Sunny Point, please.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“My instrument?  No, I– I’m not a musician.  I’m Arthur Calgary.  The man in the car.  I’m Jack Argyll’s alibi.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“Understandably so.  You’re an Egyptologist?  Oh.  Most of them are, aren’t they?  It’s ‘doctor,’ actually.  Not that I set particular store by titles, and not a doctor of medicine.  Science.  Physics.  It does, actually, yes.  I came across this only very recently… … and recognized him straightaway.  It was Christmas Eve, 1954.  He flagged me down and I gave him a lift to the local town.  I dropped him off outside the public house, I asked him for the time… I’ve never worn a watch and I’m late for everything.  He told me it was just before nine.  But it says here that your wife was… that she died just before nine.  But that’s when your son was with me, some distance away.  So– a dinner party.  I’m afraid the cliché about absent-minded scientists is true.  I went away for my work.  Just after Christmas.  A research station in the Arctic.  That’s why I didn’t see any papers, hear any radio reports.  I only got back in the last few days.  And if this hadn’t been wrapped around some equipment, I wouldn’t have known anything.  That’s right.  I wish I could have got here sooner, but I’m here now and I’m willing to go on oath in court.  So your son can be released.  Because this terrible crime, Mr. Argyll, he didn’t do it.  Well, obviously… it must have been awful.  But I just want to do what’s right.  Jack was in my car.  He’s innocent.  He died?  He can’t be dead.  He… he has to be alive.  He… he died?  How?  I’m so sorry.  Really.  So dreadfully sorry.  Yes, of course.  I don’t suppose you know of any hotels or boarding houses nearby.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“Arthur Calgary.  Dr. Arthur Calgary.  No.  Um… I got brambles caught in my trousers.  The thorns, they… it’s not a story.  I was driving.  I don’t really know about cars.  I don’t– big, I suppose.  I don’t have it anymore.  I was driving– yes.  Driving on the road that goes past your house.  Quite slowly.  I was driving on the road that goes past your house and this man stepped out into the road and put his hands up to ask for a lift.  I stopped and gave him a lift.  Your brother – Jack.  And we drove on and I dropped him off outside a pub.  I asked him for the time and I went on my way.  I don’t know.  I might have done.  Penguins don’t live in the Arctic.  They live in the southern hemisphere.  I’m not.  I’m just pointing out–” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“Arthur.  Thank you, sir.  Jack was adopted?  I’m sorry.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“I’m… not able to discuss my work.  You’re a military man.  You’ll understand.  Jack’s brother came to see me.  He suggested that I… leave and not come back.  I don’t see what else I can do.  Jack’s dead.  I can’t do any good here.  What do you mean?  But he… he didn’t.  What do you mean?  Well, if a newspaper picks it up, lawyer gets interested.  I feed you all the information that I have and together we stir the pot, and if Leo Argyll wants you gone – and he bloody well will – he’ll have to pay, and pay big.  Fifty-fifty split.  That’s… that’s extortion.  I… I won’t do that.  I can’t believe you’d suggest such a thing.  Your own family, when they’re grieving.  If I tell a newspaper or a lawyer anything, it’ll be about you.  Let go of me!  That’s where I’ve been.  I gave him a lift.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary

“Do you have the time?  I’m supposed to be there by nine.” — Dr. Arthur Calgary


Tina Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Crystal ClarkeTina Argyll

“I do have to go to work after this.” — Tina Argyll

“Butter.” — Tina Argyll

“What did he say?  Ivory.  Because it doesn’t.  It’s not different for me.” — Tina Argyll

“Don’t come back.” — Tina Argyll

“I suppose we should.  Go ahead.” — Tina Argyll

“Let me go!  Don’t!” — Tina Argyll


Mickey Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Christian CookeMickey Argyll

“I’ll get it in a minute.  Philip.  Well, you’re cutting it a bit fine, aren’t you?  I mean, they’re getting married the day after tomorrow.  What?  Well, if he catches me up his fiancée, he won’t have me, will he?  Mary, you need to lie down in a nice dark room for just about the rest of your life.  Korea was a war, not a bloody holiday.  No.  Jack’s not here.  The party?  She didn’t say anything to me.  I’m… I’m happy for you.  Yes.  Like my dad said, forget about it.  Like it was yesterday.” — Mickey Argyll

“Bu’er.  Bu’er.” — Mickey Argyll

“Don’t.  I’d say the same if I’d been charged with murder.  No.  Was lying.  Leave it.  You going on won’t change anything or bring anyone back.  Get some cigarettes.  Not the ones I like.” — Mickey Argyll

“Ssh.  No, no, no.  Who are you?  Well, you don’t have anything that proves it.  How’d you do that?  Tell me the story.  The one you told my dad.  Tell it, anyway.  What sort of car?  Describe it.  Big?  Small?  You suppose?  Where is it now?  ‘Cause you didn’t drive here.  Go on.  In the car that you don’t know whether it was big or small?  That you don’t have anymore.  How fast were you going?  Go on.  How come you don’t have anything that proves who you are?  You’re a driver.  Where’s your license?  Did you lose it?  In the Arctic?  Did it get eaten by a penguin?  Don’t take the piss out of me.  I need you to do something.  I need you to go.  Because we’ve had enough of people like you.  We’ve really had enough.  It’s important you get that.  Don’t be here tomorrow.  And don’t go talking to anyone else around here.  Remember… … I can get in.” — Mickey Argyll

“Don’t.” — Mickey Argyll

“We can’t avoid each other.  So we should probably make an effort.  One tiny little push.” — Mickey Argyll


Mary Durrant, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Eleanor TomlinsonMary Durrant, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Eleanor TomlinsonMary Durrant

“Good.  You’re here.  Finally.  Come.  Sorry, darling.  It’s only London, Mickey.  You could have got here sooner.  Mickey, this sham of a wedding cannot go ahead and I’m relying on you.  I’m the only one that cares that daddy’s marrying that bloody secretary.  Tina’s like a ghost.  Hester’s playing the innocent baby.  It’s as if mother never existed.  Daddy isn’t thinking clearly.  He’s just blinded by S-E-X.  Which is all Gwenda’s got.  But that works in our favor.  I’ve got a plan.  You pay her a lot of attention.  You flatter her.  Let her see you looking at her… at her… curves, letting your eyes linger.  You make up to her… and then, well… you know.  You make a pass at her.  She responds – which she will, because she’s a tart – and we arrange it so that daddy catches her.  And she’s gone.  He throws her out and… I mean, he’ll be upset, of course, but… he’ll have us.  Yes, but I’ll convince him it was all her.  And you’ll be completely forgiven because he’ll realize that you are both just victims of the same gold-digging slut.  I don’t know why I ever expected anything from you.  You never help.  You just swan off… to Korea, to your new life in London.  It’s alright for you, but the rest of us have to stay here.  Are you going to help save daddy from Gwenda?  Yes or no? Jack would have done it.  Wonderful.” — Mary Durrant

“Do you ever stop talking?  I thought this had stopped.  Why won’t these ghouls just leave us alone.” — Mary Durrant

“Well, of course, I saw through him immediately.  If you’re going to pretend to be a doctor, don’t dress as a caricature of one.  A Tweed suit and winter brogues in July?  It’s ridiculous.  Oh, the usual.  Daddy dealt with him.  Look at her.  Pointing at flowers as if she’s the queen.  You know, I thought Mickey might help for once, but he only cares about himself.  Is her dress really white?  Ivory is the same as white.  This is unbearable!  How can you go along with it, bending over backwards to be her new best friend?  Why doesn’t it kill you like it kills me?  Well… I was the first.  I loved mother longest.” — Mary Durrant

“Mother–” — Mary Durrant

“It’s different for you.  You think you were the favorite.  But you weren’t.  Mother just felt sorry for you.” — Mary Durrant

“You can’t go out.  Now, you won’t drink too much, will you?” — Mary Durrant

“I don’t want to be your friend.  And as for taking my poor mother’s place, with your elocution lessons and… your padded brassieres… … you don’t have a chance.” — Mary Durrant

“Shut up.  Thank you.  Well, it’s just that it’s my last evening here.  So I thought I’d just… look, it won’t take me a moment to change.  You are happy for me, mother, aren’t you?” — Mary Durrant


Hester Argyll, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Ella PurnellHester Argyll

“No, that’s going to the hotel on the morning so there’s no danger of Leo seeing it.  We saw it, though.  It’s white and that’s all I’m saying.  Oh!  But Mickey–” — Hester Argyll

“Jack always said he was innocent.  When we were standing round his coffin, and they’d had to cover most of his face so we couldn’t see… …what had been done to him, how he’d been hurt… you didn’t once think, ‘what if Jack was telling the truth?’  Well, I did.  I do.  I think about it all the time.  What if Jack was telling the truth?  What if he was innocent?  What if he had an alibi?  What if Dr. Calgary– poor Tina.  That’s why I hide up here.  So they can’t make me help.  Where are you going?  There’s cigarettes in the store cupboard.  You’re not?” — Hester Argyll

“It looks like real gold.” — Hester Argyll


Philip Durrant, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Matthew GoodePhilip Durrant, Ordeal By Innocence, BBC One, Amazon Prime Video, Mammoth Screen, Agatha Christie Limited, Matthew GoodePhilip Durrant

“You ready for me, darling?  Well, well!  The prodigal returns.  Let’s round up the fatted calf, slit its throat and sport and play in its hot blood.  Mickey.” — Philip Durrant

“I say, I do hope that’s not the dress.  I’ll take mine in my room.  Strange… turning up like that, out of the blue, all this time later.  Very strange.  Well, I’m sure we’ll all give it a try, but it brings it all back, doesn’t it?  Your poor, dear mother.” — Philip Durrant

“Darling… … an evening spent… in the company of your father’s friends and their bloated pig wives, braying over my head while my face is at… crotch level… … not my idea of fun.  I’m just going to go out and have a quiet supper in town, alright?  Oh… ah, yes.  You look very pretty.  Don’t let any of the men flirt with you, will you?  I’ll see you later.” — Philip Durrant

“Ah… Dr. Calgary.  I apologize for not coming to find you myself, but I’m not as good at the stairs as I once was.  We weren’t introduced earlier.  I’m Flight Lieutenant Durrant but please call me Philip.  Arthur.  I’d like to buy you dinner.  I thought that at least one person in the family should be hospitable.  What do you say?  Thank you.  It’s funny, isn’t it?  How some murders fly right under the radar, and no-one really cares and… and others… make a lot of noise.  Although, let’s face it, perfect mother beaten to death by her adopted son is a newspaperman’s dream.  Really makes you sit up over your toast and marmalade.  Especially when the perfect mother is an heiress.  Yes.  God knows, they all are.  Even the maid is from some dismal foundling home.  You see, they couldn’t have children of their own, so they… filled the house with little unwanteds.  Landed with their bums in the butter with all that Argyll.  Not that I see any of it.  They keep me on very short commons.  I mean, every man gets himself into a bit of debt.  You’d think they’d be only too happy to help a chap out.  Flying ace.  Decorated.  I’m a bloody hero.  Whole world tilted on my wing.  I was… I was a god.  Now… now I piss in a bottle.  Cheers.  I tip them extra.  Don’t I?  Yes, I’d only got out of the hospital the night before Rachel’s sad demise.  I… wrote the car off on the way back from the races.  Broke my back.  So am I.” — Philip Durrant

“So, what were you doing in the Arctic, then?  Official secrets?  Hm?  Well, you’re right to keep quiet.  You never know who’s listening these days.  And all after the same thing.  Mickey?  Now, what did he want, eh?  How typically charming of him!  And?  Are you going to go away and never come back?  There’s an awful lot of good that you can do here.  You’re going to stick around, Arthur, tell your version of events and let the rumor mill do the rest.  Place like this, suspicions run riot.  The whole bloody family are suspects.  Which one of them’s got blood on their hands?  So deliciously squalid.” — Philip Durrant

“Jack killed Rachel, alright.  He was a nasty little bastard.  A demon seed.  Yes, he did.  Of course he did.  His fingerprints were all over the murder weapon – a whiskey decanter, which weighed a ton, I can assure you.  No, no, no, he got what was coming to him.  But people starting to think it might not have been him… works very well for us.  Sit– sit down.  If you’re a scientist doing secret research in the Arctic, then I’m a baboon’s ballsack.  The sun doesn’t set far north in the midsummer.  You’d have color in your face, but you look like you’ve been living under a rotting log and to me that says one thing.  You’ve been in prison.  Yes, I’m right, aren’t I?  Is that where you met Jack?  My arse!  You’re a conman.  You’ve been inside. One word from me will have you sent straight back.  Oh, Christ, you look terrified.  What are you so scared of, Arthur?  Oh!  Help!  He’s attacking me!  A war hero in a wheelchair!  He’s attacking me!” — Philip Durrant



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