All posts by David Keirsey

Dr. David Mark Keirsey is a scientist that is interested in how and why the world works. The first half of his professional career was as a Computer Scientist, specializing in Artificial Intelligence. Notably, he was part of a team who created the software for the first operation of an autonomous cross-country robotic vehicle. In the current latter part of his career, he has broaden his interest to include all of science, mathematics, computation, and the history and future of the world. He is working on ebooks Mathematics Itself and Existence Itself. He is working also on illustrating his father, Dr. David West Keirsey's best-selling work on Keirsey Temperament. David Mark is publishing some his father's work on what his father called Dark Escape: The Wholistic Theory of Madness.

We don't put anybody's name on the back


He said: Hustle.  Good things will happen.  Keep hustling.

It’s a really simple formula: team, loyalty, competition. And lastly, hard work.

The basics. The fundamentals.

It was about we and us, for 62 years.  Constant.  He pushed so hard.  He expected good things.

It was about family.  And he took his team as a second family.

Continue reading We don't put anybody's name on the back

The Inventor

Who Invents?

Who should get the credit for the Invention?

When does the Invention occur?

How does the Invention happen?

What is Invention?

As they walked along the shore, two very competitive guys: both “filthy rich” by anyone’s standard, both had disrupted established giant corporations, and created their own companies, changing the world significantly.

He pulled him close such that they went nose to nose

“Larry, this is why it’s really important that I’m your friend.  You don’t need any more money.”

Both were kind of inventors, but they were different in Temperament, and completely different goals in life.  Larry is a Promoter Artisan and he keeps score by money: his interest was in winning.  He loved the fact that he used IBM’s own research to beat them in database software, making himself fabulously wealthy.

For Steve, he was competitive in a completely different way. It wasn’t about the money or the winning.  Rather, it was about his legacy: his company.

He hadn’t changed his passion. Long ago, he had seen a way to start making cool things, inventions, that were useful, that he wanted to use — like he had started several decades before with another friend, the Woz.

Continue reading The Inventor

Her Third Act

She was sitting next to Marilyn Monroe in Lee Strasberg‘s Actors Studio.

Lee said to her “you have talent.”

That made “all the difference in the world” — she had someone tell her that she had some self-worth.

The funny thing is you would think she wouldn’t have needed it because she was a very beautiful woman, and she had had a privileged upbringing.

But you see, that was something that hadn’t happened to her before. What you see is not always what you get. For Hank, was a complicated man and hard to get to know, to say the least.

And Jane couldn’t understand that in her first two acts.

Continue reading Her Third Act

Be Water

Adaptive. Flexible.

… Artisans are definitively practical, that is adaptive, resilient, flexible, hence unconventional and unorthodox, both in the sense of being spontaneously so inclined, and in the sense of acting in ways that only they can appreciate if not understand, given their insistent and persistent adaptive agenda. They do this by adapting their ways of using words and tools to the necessities of the moment that come about when some tactical maneuver goes awry. [Personology page 191]

Continue reading Be Water

Me!? Arrogant..

Although most people do not take glee in being perceived as being “arrogant,”  however, many male Rationals will admit they are not particularly bothered as being perceived as arrogant – well, because they are arrogant. No sense in denying the facts. Female Rationals sometimes get a moniker (deserved or undeserved – depending on your political religion) such as the Iron Lady, because of this perceived arrogance. With that arrogance, I suspect political religion was why Hollywood did such a hatchet job on Margaret Thatcher in the now playing biographical movie.

Rationals are wont to think of themselves as the prime movers who must pit their utilitarian ways and means against custom and tradition, in an endless struggle to bring efficiency and goal-directness to enterprise, an attitude regarded by many as arrogant” [Please Understand Me II, page 169]

Continue reading Me!? Arrogant..

Believe, Believe, Believe

He is controversial.

People can’t stop talking about him.

No, he isn’t a Bad Boy. He isn’t flashy or charming. No, he isn’t even a Naughty Boy. He isn’t argumentative.

He just wins, most of the time.  And works hard.

No, not really, actually  — he works very very very very hard. Incredibly hard.

Yet, he “don’t get no respect” from some quarters — and he certainly doesn’t care whether he does. For he believes he is doing good work.

He remarked after losing badly, “We kept fighting for the entire day: That’s something I’m extremely proud of.”

But, then, they beat the Steelers on his first pass in overtime.

Even Lady Gaga tweets: Thats what the **** a champion looks like.

So why controversial?

Continue reading Believe, Believe, Believe