All posts by David Keirsey

Dr. David Mark Keirsey is a scientist that is interested in how and why the world works. The first half of his professional career was as a Computer Scientist, specializing in Artificial Intelligence. Notably, he was part of a team who created the software for the first operation of an autonomous cross-country robotic vehicle. In the current latter part of his career, he has broaden his interest to include all of science, mathematics, computation, and the history and future of the world. He is working on ebooks Mathematics Itself and Existence Itself. He is working also on illustrating his father, Dr. David West Keirsey's best-selling work on Keirsey Temperament. David Mark is publishing some his father's work on what his father called Dark Escape: The Wholistic Theory of Madness.

A Second Chance

He is grateful for a second chance. And he is doing well with it – at least for now.

Yes, he screwed up before – royally. He knew it. “I had burned bridges”

No, it wasn’t the addiction. No, that wasn’t it.

“It was the anger.”

“I had issues with anger. I wasn’t behaving professionally. I wasn’t accountable, no consequences, no rules.”

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Reverence for Life

As a Viking traveler of books and people, I have occasioned to meet a person from a different place, a different time, and a different world, through the labyrinth of books.

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume

Presumably, this is what Henry Stanley said to Dr. David Livingstone, a missionary who had gone into the “wilds of Africa,” and Stanley was paid to find him which took about six months, a difficult and tortuous expedition.

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One in the Same

At last, every hero becomes a bore.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

He saw himself and the institution he built as one in the same.

He was revered and reviled. He was founder and the builder of an United States Federal institution, that now has over thirty thousand employees and has a budget of eight billion. Once upon a time, famous, and respected, he was idolized by kids in the 1930s, for he was responsible for creating the good feelings about G men (government men), the prototypical hero of law and order, and justice, in an earlier age when government wasn’t as pervasive as it is today. Later, he was hated and reviled, on the top of list of the 1960s conspiracy theorist’s boogie men: he was viewed as a nexus for secrets, power, and repression of free speech.

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Of the Greatest Generation

He never wanted to talk about what he had seen.

He was typical of his generation, they just didn’t talk about it.

That is strange because he made a good living by talking. Or more accurately, reporting what he thought. He was a writer above all else. He was probably the most famous curmudgeon of all time.

He would complain. Like clockwork. For nigh thirty three years, every week, for a few minutes. Probably the best and funniest complainer on American TV.

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Risky Business

A Golden Boy of business and politics, until now. He was a darling of his political party, for he was generous with his money. He was a man of influence, until now. Now, I doubt the party wants to take his call.

Bold and daring at heart, and ever-optimistic that things will go their way, Promoters will take tremendous risks to get what they want, and seem exhilarated by walking close to the edge of disaster.” Please Understand Me II

He has taken risks all his life. Starting as a bond trader in Goldman Sachs, he rose through the ranks to become co-CEO. With his help the company went public, he became worth $400 million. Losing to Hank Paulson, for the CEO job of Goldman, he switched to politics. He wasn’t shy in using some of that money he gotten to get elected as first as a US Senator and then Governor of New Jersey. He spent over $62 million of his own money on his campaign, the most expensive Senate campaign in U.S. History.

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I’m over my head, but it sure feels nice.

They had this mega-watt attraction, they could be charming as hell, and cold as ice.

“You just wanted to be around them,” she said to Oprah.

But, she had been angry.  She had been pissed off, too many times.  So she ended it.  No more games.

The second time, she had seen enough.

She was tough: a Crafter Artisan, very observant but not very self-reflective, and she was over her head.  She left him, she cut him off.  She didn’t want to think about, she couldn’t without going crazy.  She finally moved on.  She forgot.

Continue reading I’m over my head, but it sure feels nice.

Be A Viking Bystander

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view – until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” spoken by Atticus Finch, in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee.

How do you “truly” climb into another’s skin and walk around?  It is a hard thing to do, well.  For that person may be a different kind of person from you, from a different time, and from a different place.

My avocation since I was a child was as a Viking bystander.  My vocation lately has been as a Viking reader of books and people.

One can try to “climb into another’s skin” through watching a movie or play, or reading a book.  This is something we can do as humans.   We can visit different lands and different tribes – the modern words for “lands” and “tribes” is countries and cultures.  We can also visit different “ages” – through movies and living in cultures that are “slower” than your “culture” – although there are limitations and there is a possibility to not really get the “gestalt” of that age and place.

Mostly, we don’t understand “truly” – the Temperament, the Tribe, the Age that is not like us

But we can try.

Here are some autobiographies of the various Temperaments, many from a different time and different place.  Climb into the person’s skin, and walk around in it – at least for awhile.

Rationals

Ben Franklin (Inventor)

Mark Twain (Inventor)

Margaret Thatcher (Fieldmarshal)

Ulysses S. Grant (Mastermind)

Charles Darwin (Architect)

Linus Torvalds (Architect)

Idealists

Jane Goodall (Counselor)

Mohandas Gandhi (Counselor)

Jane Fonda (Teacher)

Albert Schweitzer (Healer)

Karen Armstrong (Healer)

Joan Baez (Champion)

Artisans

Katherine Hepburn (Crafter)

Lance Armstrong (Crafter)

Donald Trump (Promoter)

Neil Simon (Composer)

Jim Cramer (Performer)

Bill Clinton (Performer)

Guardians

Barbara Walters (Provider)

Sam Walton (Provider)

Andrea Mitchell (Inspector)

Mike Wallace (Supervisor)

George H. W. Bush (Protector)